Final state exam

The department’s scheduled date for the Final State Examination is set at the beginning of the semester. The examination schedule — date and room number — will be published on the IS Document Server two weeks prior to the exam. The exact time will be determined only after the individual course areas have been closed by the Study Office (under the State Examination Code, the deadline for students is three working days prior to the FSE), and will be published one to two days prior to the examination. Students should therefore monitor the IS Document Server, since this will be the only source of information on any changes. Setting up e-mail notifications in the IS’s Events section is highly recommended.

The FSE consists in the defence of the diploma thesis and an oral examination in three state examination subjects: Theories and Concepts, Energy Policy in Central Europe, European Energy Policy. Should a student fail, he or she will re-sit only that part of the exam (e.g., the defence or the failed subject).

Both the defence and the FSE subjects are evaluated using the following system of marks:
A – excellent
B – very good
C – good
D – satisfactory
E – sufficient
F – fail

Before sitting the FSE, all books borrowed from the library or lecturers must be returned.

The FSE Procedure

  • The defence and the oral examination will both take place on a single date.
  • The State Examination does not begin with a formal opening; students must arrive at least 90 minutes prior to their examination times as indicated on the schedule.
  • 60 minutes before their defence, students will draw at random a single thematic area from each subject. They will then prepare their answers independently. 
  • The State Examination starts with the Defence of the Master’s Thesis. Students will first briefly introduce their thesis. The reports of the thesis supervisor and opponent are then presented, followed by general discussion. The total length of the thesis defence is approximately 20 minutes.
  • Within the oral examination, students may select the order of questions to be answered. In sitting the Theories and Concepts examination, the theories and concepts in question should be illustrated using specific cases or policies: ideally from the topic area of the diploma thesis or from the subject areas specified for the State Examination.
  • The FSE lasts approximately 60 minutes per student. The results are announced at the end of the day on which the examination takes place. After the results have been announced, the examination committee is available to answer any potential questions about the examination or the evaluation.
  • Both the defence and the oral examination are open to general public.

Subject areas and reading lists

The list of subject areas and required readings may be downloaded as a pdf.

Theories and concepts

1) Energy Security Conceptualization

  • Traditional approaches towards energy security: coexisting dimensions (Sovacool) and multi-level conceptualizations (Cornell).
  • Critique and reformulation of the concept: conceptual stretching (Cuita) and context-dependent nature (Chester).
  • Application of selected conceptualization to a particular situation or a selected state’s energy policy.

Literature

2) Traditionalist approaches to security in IR

  • Realism in IR: basic principles, actors and structure, main concepts (balance of power, security dilemma).
  • Realism in International Political Economy: economic nationalism, theory of hegemonic stability.
  • Liberalism in IR: basic principles, actors and structure, main concepts (markets, regimes, interdependence).
  • Liberalism in International Political Economy.
  • Traditional approach to security in IR (Walt).
  • Strategic vs. market approaches towards energy security.
  • Application of a selected concept to a particular policy or context.

Literature

  • Frieden, J. A., Lake, D. A. (2000): International Political Economy: Perspectives on Global Power and Wealth. London: Routledge (1-16).
  • Gilpin, R. (1986): The Political Economy of International Relations. Princeton University Press, (25-64).
  • Keohane, R., Nye, J. (2001): Power and interdependence (3. edition). New York: Longman, pp. 3-32. (30 pages)
  • Klare, M. T. Petroleum anxiety and the militarization of energy security. In: Moran, D. & Russell, J. A. (2009, Eds.): Energy Security and Global Politics: The Militarization of Resource Management. London and New York: Routledge, pp. 39-61. (12 pages)
  • Nordhaus, W. (2009): The Economics of an Integrated World Oil Market. Keynote Address at International Energy Workshop, pp. 1-24. (23 pages)
  • Walt, S. (1991): The Renaissance of Security Studies. International Studies Quarterly, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 211-239. (29 pages)
  • Waltz, K. (1979): Theory of international politics. Boston: McGraw-Hill, pp. 116-123. (8 pages)

3) Revisionist approaches to security in IR

  • Social constructivism in IR: principles, actors and structure, main concepts (social construction, intersubjectivity, discourse).
  • Copenhagen School: assumptions, conceptual framework (securitization, sector approach to security, regional security complex).
  • Critical Theory (Aberystwyth School): assumptions, actors and structure, main concepts (triangle of violence, emancipation).
  • Revisionist approaches to security in IR (Krause).
  • Application of a selected concept to a particular policy or context.

Literature

  • Baylis, J. International and global security in the post-cold war era. In: Baylis, J. & Smith, S. (Eds., 2001): The Globalization of World Politics. Oxford University Press, pp. 265-276. (12 pages)
  • Booth, K. (1991): Security and Emancipation. Review of International Studies, Vol. 17, No. 4, pp. 313-326. (14 pages)
  • Buzan, B., Waever, O., and Wilde, J. (1997): Security: New Framework for Analysis. Lynne Rienner Publishers, pp. 1-55, 163-193. (86 pages)
  • Cox, R. W. (1981): Social Forces, States and World Orders: Beyond International Relations Theory. Millennium: Journal of International Studies, Vol. 10, No. 2.
  • Krause, K. & Williams, M. (1996): Broadening the Agenda of Security Studies: Politics and Methods. Mershon International Studies Review, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 229-254. (26 pages)
  • Searle, J. (1995): The Construction of Social Reality. London: Penguin Group, pp. 1-29. (29 pages)
  • Wendt, A. (1999): Social Theory of international Politics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 246-259. (24 pages)

Energy policy in Central Europe

(Note: The students are required to follow the current development and changes in companies‘ ownership structures in the respective subject areas.)

1) Coal industry

  • Essential country-specific characteristics of the Czech energy sector
  • Importance of the coal sector, key actors, utilization, trading, trends
  • Current issues in the coal sector
  • Trends in coal exploitation as regards the Energy & Resource Policy of the Czech Republic

Literature

  • Vlček, T., Jirušek, M. (2015): Key factors that drive the Czech Republic‘s coal industry. Coal International 263 (3), pp. 28-36. (9 pages)
  • Sivek, M., Kavina, P., Jirásek, J., Malečková, V. (2012): Factors Influencing the Selection of the Past and Future Strategies for Electricity Generation in the Czech Republic. Energy Policy 48, pp. 650-656. (7 pages)
  • Gutmann, K., Huscher, J., Urbaniak, D., & White, A. (2014). Europe’s dirty 30 - How the EU’s coal-fired power plants are undermining its climate efforts, pp. 1-17. Available at http://awsassets.panda.org/downloads/dirty_30_report_finale.pdf (17 pages)
  • Vlček, T., Černoch, F. (2013): The energy sector and energy policy of the Czech Republic. Brno: Masarykova univerzita, pp. 25-88. (64 pages)

2) Crude Oil

  • Importance and utilization of crude oil in CE
  • Czech market structure, key actors, contracts
  • Diversification projects and market trends in CE

Literature

  • ILF Consulting Engineers, & Purvin & Gertz. (2010). Study on the Technical Aspects of Variable Use of Oil Pipelines - Coming into the EU from Third Countries. Overall Report, pp. 1-42. Available at https://ec.europa.eu/energy/sites/ener/files/documents/2010_reporting_technical_aspects.pdf (42 pages)
  • Vlček, T. (2015). Alternative Oil Supply Infrastructures for the Czech Republic and Slovak Republic. 1th edition. Brno: Masarykova univerzita, 2015, pp. 61-93, 113-173. (94 pages)

3) Natural Gas

  • Importance and use of natural gas in CE
  • Czech market structure, key actors, contracts
  • Diversification projects in CE and market trends

Literature

  • Černoch, F., Dančák, B., Kovačovská, J., Ocelík, P., Osička, J., Vlček, T., & Zapletalová, V. (2011). The Future of Natural Gas Security in the V4 Countries. A Scenario Analysis and the EU Dimension. Brno: Masaryk University, pp. 52-116, 269-286. (83 pages)
  • Vlček, T., Černoch, F. (2013): The energy sector and energy policy of the Czech Republic. Brno: Masarykova univerzita, pp. 109-130. (22 pages)

4) Renewable energy sources

  • The global context: market drivers, technological advances and decreasing costs
  • Development of RES in the Czech Republic and Germany: motivations, policies, results.

Literature

  • Hake, J., et al. (2015): The German Energiewende – History and status quo. Energy 92 (3), pp. 532–546. (14 pages)
  • Vlček, T., Černoch, F. (2013): The energy sector and energy policy of the Czech Republic. Brno: Masarykova univerzita, pp. 153-188. (36 pages)

5) Nuclear Energy

  • The state of the industry in the region: current issues and prospects.
  • Operations at Rosatom State Nuclear Corporation in CEE and associated behavioural models.
  • Nuclear fuel specifics and issues in the CEE market.
  • Nuclear Energy in the Czech Republic.

Literature

  • Jirušek, M., & Vlček, T. et al. (2015). Energy Security in Central and Eastern Europe and the Operations of Russian State-Owned Energy Enterprises. Brno: Masarykova univerzita, 2015, pp. 106-130, 141-156, 206-218, 243-255, 338-362. Available at https://munispace.muni.cz/index.php/munispace/catalog/download/790/2525/432-1 (92 pages)
  • Vlček, T., Černoch, F. (2013): The energy sector and energy policy of the Czech Republic. Brno: Masarykova univerzita, pp. 131-152. (22 pages)

European energy policy

1) Internal energy market I

  • Theoretical approach – traditional vs liberalization paradigm.
  • The energy industry as a network industry.
  • Economics and regulatory principles of market liberalization.

Literature

  • Cameron, P. D. (2007): Competition in Energy Markets: Law and Regulation in the European Union. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 3-36. (34 pages)

2) Internal energy market II

  • Development of the internal energy market: liberalization packages and related legislation.
  • Clashes between the actors: European Commission, Member States, energy companies.
  • New institutions (regulators, transmission system operators) and supranational cooperation between them.

Literature

  • Johnson, A., Block, G. (2012): EU Energy Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 35-150. (116 pages)

3) The environmental dimension of European energy policy I

  • The role of the EU in establishing the Kyoto protocol.
  • The role of the EU in international climate talks: positions, tools, results.
  • The European Emissions Trading System (EU ETS). 

Literature

  • Skjaerseth, J. B., Wettestad, J. (2008): EU Emission Trading: Initiation, Decision-making and Implementation. Surrey: Ashgate Publishing, pp. 35-64, 103-180. (106 pages)

4) The environmental dimension of European energy policy II

  • Renewable energy sources and their role in European energy policy.
  • Energy efficiency.

Literature

  • Buchan, D. (2009): Energy and Climate Change: Europe at the Cross Roads. Oxford: Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, pp. 137-164, 191-204. (40 pages) 

5) EU external energy policy 

  • Conceptualization of the EU’s external energy policy.
  • Relations between the EU and the main energy suppliers, consumers and transit countries.

Literature

  • Youngs, R. (2011). Foreign Policy and Energy security: Markets, Pipelines, and Politics. In Birchfield, V. L. & Duffield, J. S., Toward a Common European Union Energy Policy: Problems, Progress, and Prospects. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 41-60. (20 pages)
  • Talus, K. (2013). EU Energy Law and Policy: a Critical Account. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 232-268. (37 pages)
  • Grätz, J. (2011). Common Rules without Strategy: EU Energy Policy and Russia. In Birchfield, V. L. & Duffield, J. S., Toward a Common European Union Energy Policy: Problems, Progress, and Prospects. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 61-87. (27 pages) 
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